Barbara Wilson’s posts

Barbara Wilson

About Barbara Wilson

Working with Cancer

BARBARA WILSON, founder of Working with Cancer, is a senior HR professional with almost 40 years’ experience. Her previous roles were Group Head of Strategic HR at Catlin Group Ltd, Deputy Head of HR at Schroders Investment Management, and prior to that Chief of Staff to the Group HR Director at Barclays. Before joining Barclays she was a senior management consultant at Price Waterhouse. After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005, Barbara set up a group called ‘Working with Cancer’. The group was the first to develop guidelines on work and cancer for HR professionals, line managers, employees and carers. From 2008 to 2010 she chaired a major part of the NHS/Macmillan 5-year Cancer Survivorship strategy, developing ‘work and cancer’ support tools for employees, employers and clinicians. She continues to work as a volunteer with Macmillan Cancer Support and speaks about ‘work and cancer’ at various conferences and events. Barbara trained as a coach at Ashridge Management College and has a history degree from Cambridge University. She is married with two sons and lives in Surrey.

Choose Life

10Dec

Someone asked me the other day whether cancer was ultimately a positive, transformative experience. Gosh, what a question! Thinking positively about cancer didn’t come easily to me at all, and I can’t imagine it comes easily to anyone. I experienced … Continue reading

  

How can managers support working carers who look after someone with cancer?

10Dec

Peter’s manager had been trying to get hold of me urgently. I left a routine meeting I had been chairing to call him back. One of the longer term members of his team had recently become a dad (for the … Continue reading

  

The Hidden Impact of Cancer – Dealing with the Psychological Impact of a Cancer Diagnosis

10Dec

  A few days ago I took part in two events concerning cancer and mental health. You might well ask – what has that got to do with cancer and returning to work?  My response to that is that it … Continue reading

  

How do we get men to be more open about cancer

1Oct

Silence isn't always golden

One major issue that has been raised with us a number of times is how to get men to be more open about health issues and cancer specifically so that HR professionals and line managers can provide them with the … Continue reading

  

Returning to work after cancer – what’s so important?

24Jul

Enabling cancer survivors  to return to work benefits the wider community

Returning to work after cancer – what’s so important? There are at present over 2 million people in the UK living with cancer and Macmillan Cancer Support estimates that by 2030 there will be 4 million. But the story of … Continue reading

  

The Critical Role of Line Managers

1Jul

I am often asked what is the most important factor in helping people return to work after cancer. Clearly a lot depends on the diagnosis, the stage that the cancer is at, and the kind of work the individual does. … Continue reading

  

Good news and bad news re cancer issued today.

7Jun

      I’m sure you’ve heard the news today based on research by Macmillan  that by 2020 almost half of Britons will get cancer in their lifetime although 38% will not die from the disease. The growth in the … Continue reading

  

Angelina

15May

I’ve just been asked to do an interview about Angelina Jolie’s double mastectomy in the context of working in an industry where appearance is everything. As Hadley Freeman wrote today in the Guardian, she has done something extraordinary and brave.  That doesn’t make … Continue reading

  

Rise in Cancer patients facing discrimination at work

3May

Today Macmillan published a press release showing that four in ten people (37%) who return to work after cancer treatment say they experience some kind of discrimination from their employer or colleagues – compared to just under a quarter (23%) … Continue reading

  

Working With Cancer – Beginnings

2May

2013-04-30 09.59.25

It was probably the most important bath I’ve ever had. Why? Well because it was while I was soaking away, floating in the steamy scented water and wondering if my hair would ever grow back after chemotherapy, that I thought … Continue reading