erection

Post your men’s sexual health questions, including erectile dysfunction, male infertility, cancer of the penis, vasectomies, and what diseases such as prostate cancer and bladder cancer can mean for your sex life here.

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happy dave
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2016 8:45 pm
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by happy dave on Wed Feb 12, 2020 6:14 pm

erection

advice please i had prostate cancer so it was removed after surgery i was given a vacume pump to help
me get a erection so we could still have sex. due to unable to erectile problem unfortunetly it dont work for me knot for lack of trying believe me whats the alternative if any. ps i am 67 and dont feel over the hill yet.

david

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Lorraine Grover
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:11 pm
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by Lorraine Grover on Fri Feb 14, 2020 5:29 pm

Re: erection

You are certainly not over the hill! Even if you are not using it for sex, the vacuum pump can help maintain the length of the penis with regular use. The constriction ring would need to be added to maintain an erection. If you had a 'nerve sparing' prostatectomy it would be worth trying tablets such as sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil or avanafil. If there is no reason why your health or other medication you may be taking would stop you trying them, I would start with the maximum dose. It is important to have sexual stimulation to help them work.
If tablets fail there is an alprostadil cream (Vitaros) which can have limited effect that you apply to the opening of they head of the penis. Alprostadil pellets (MUSE) can be inserted into the urethra (waterpipe that you wee through) to help get an erection. Alprostadil injections (Viridal Duo or Caverject Dual Chamber) or injections of Invicorp can be very effective. I use them a lot as they work so well and give men and their partners back often what they have been missing. With correct instruction, combined with psychosexual support they can be used easily for sexual activity. Men often worry about the thought of a needle going into the side of the shaft of the penis. They mainly describe it going in as 'pricking their finger with a rose thorn' or in fact no pain at all!
Seeing a sex therapist to help manage these changes can also help achieve a satisfactory outcome.
Definitely see the healthcare professional caring for you to discuss the above suggestions in further detail. You are entitled to treatments via an NHS prescription under Schedule 2 guidelines as a consequence of your prostate cancer. This can be variable across the country.
Lorraine Grover
Psychosexual Nurse Specialist

http://www.talkhealthpartnership.com/on ... grover.php

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