post-surgery incontinence

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by Guest Posts on Mon Jun 28, 2021 4:18 pm

post-surgery incontinence

Having had surgery a while ago, my husband is still finding that he leaks urine. How long would you expect this to last after surgery? The consultant did say this could be an issue, but at the time it didn’t seem so important as opposed to having the surgery itself. My husband finds it very difficult to talk about and absolutely refuses to wear pads as he calls them nappies! Please can you advise what I should suggest to him – this is proving to be a very difficult and challenging time.
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Arun Sahai
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by Arun Sahai on Thu Jul 01, 2021 5:11 pm

Re: post-surgery incontinence

There are differing causes of urinary incontinence after prostate surgery. If he has had radical prostatectomy, the commonest is stress incontinence (leaking when coughing, laughing, sneezing, walking, movement, bending). There is a natural recovery over the first 12-18 months. Pelvic floor exercises are the first steps. If he is still bothered by incontinence, he should seek expert opinion. Ask his prostate surgeon to refer him to a surgeon interested in managing incontinence. There are definitely options that can help and improve his quality of life. The first steps are to understand the cause.

info@lorrainegrover.com
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by info@lorrainegrover.com on Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:03 pm

Re: post-surgery incontinence

Communication is so important, the team caring for your husband may not realise the impact it is having on you both. We are all here to support you. I appreciate for men in particular, talking about incontinence can be distressing, many do. There are now men's underpants that are stylish with a leak proof design and washable. It may also be helpful to speak to a Continence Nurse Specialist or Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist as they can provide assessment, support and a management plan. It is helpful to check that any strategy suggested is being monitored and is being done correctly. Sometimes a slight tweak can make all the difference.

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