Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

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ignacvucko
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:59 am
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by ignacvucko on Tue Jun 21, 2011 2:30 am

Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

What is the link between exercise and dyshydrotic exzema?

I have dyshydrotic eczema that I can make occur at will.
All I have to do is exercise (go for a run or ride a bike) and then within 20 minutes the bubbles of my fingers will start to appear and will not disappear for 2 weeks.
While exercising I can feel my hands 'burning' as a precursor to the bubbles being formed.
The more strenuous the exercise and the more humid the environment, the bigger and more numerous and more severe the bubbles.
If the exercise is strenuous then I also get the bubbles on my feet.
After even exercise on a cool dry day, the bubbles can easily form.
I sit and watch the bubbles magically slowly appear under perfectly normal skin...and of course I immediately pop and re-pop them as they form as it makes the healing process quicker.
The bubbles continue to form for the next 48 hours after which my hands will become INSANELY itchy for 3-4 days before the bubbles start to scab over.

Before developing dyshydrotic eczema I was a long distance runner and cyclist routinely stressing my body for as long as 5 hours a day 6 days a week and never had any of these issues.
I've had to give up exercising because of my dyshydrotic eczema...I exercise once and then have to wait 2-3 weeks before my hands have healed enough for me to exercise again.

What is the link between exercise and dyshydrotic exzema?
Does anyone else have exercise-induced eczema?
How have you dealt with it - apart from simply avoiding exercise?
Please don't point me to a special cream, apple cider vinegar, topical steroids, hydrogen peroxide, diets, etc... --- i have them all and have tried them repeatedly.
I did find an article showing that there is a link between oxygen and dyshyrotic eczema:
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Resolutio ... a083484613
But I'm not sure what to make of it -- should I get a canister of oxygen and breath it in immediately after exercising???

Thanks for reading...

My background:
============
I'm 38 years old.
I had atopic eczema as a baby and child after which it disappeared.
At age 20 it returned but was very mild and manageable.
At age 30 I had a terrible episode and also developed dyshydrotic eczema after never having it before.
In the past I have needed several courses of prednisone to control my eczema.
I also have asthma (extremely mild -- only use a puffer 2-3 times a year)
I also have allergies (allergic to nearly every tree/pollen/cats/dogs/etc.)
Life is very difficult.
I use Triamcinolone tpoical steroids on a daily basis which keeps my atopic exzema under control.
I also have a home narrow band PUVB unit that greatly helps for the atopy.
But, my dyshydrotic eczema is made worse with the PUVB, so it's always a delicate balancing act.

Kiedrea
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:20 pm
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by Kiedrea on Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:04 pm

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

Oh my god I think you might be right.

I've been tackling this from such a nutrition based standpoint and never stopped to think it might be the exercise that was causing my dishydrotic eczema. The first time it appeared was 4 years ago. It happened on my right ring finger as itchy skin.
A year later there were vesicles for a few months and I went to see a Japanese skin specialist who diagnosed pompholyx. The doc said there's no cure for it, one theory is that it's sweat that is unable to get through a thicker than normal epidermis, another is that it occurs as the seasons change from hot to cold and vice versa. She gave me some creams to help the dry skin get better after the flare ups. The eczema gradually went away.
This year I felt my hands getting a bit bumpy in the new year, I could feel it coming back but the vesicles were not popping or anything so I lived in hope that my hands would not flare up. I started crossfit at the end of November 2010 and through reading a lot of Paleo blogs came across a Kiwi guy who had cured his dishydrotic eczema by keeping a strict Paleo diet. I felt safe in the knowledge that if I kept eating strict Paleo that my hands would not flare up. At the end of February I broke from my Paleo diet to carb load for the Tokyo marathon; I ate some pizza, pasta and some dextrose drinks. During the marathon my gut was sore and I supplemented with carb loading gels, afterwards I rewarded myself with ribs, chips, beer and coke. When I woke up I my legs ached as expected, but not expected was all the vesicles on half the fingers on my hands and some on my feet too. I immediately put this down to breaking from my strict Paleo diet and got back to a strict Paleo regime.

However from there on in the outbreaks continued. Not as severe as the morning after the marathon but they kept on. I theorised that it is due to cortisol rising during the intensity of a marathon run, I theorised that I had a leaky gut brought on by overconsumption of Neolithic foods, I theorised that my omega 6:3 ratio might be out of whack, I theorised that it could be an acid imbalance in my body. I am he'll bent on getting to the bottom of this and for the past 5 months I have done nothing but study nutrition in my spare time. My diet has got stricter and stricter giving me more energy and more motivation to train hard.

In an effort to really find out what is causing this I did a 3 day apple detox eating nothing but apples for 3 days. Unable to consume protein of course I abstained from weightlifting during the experiment. After 3 days my hands were well on their way to being healed and again I blamed diet for the dishydrotic eczema.

Outbreaks continued and I dialed the diet down to only steak and sweet potatoes for a week. This vastly improved symptoms, but not as good as the apple detox. I pit the improvement down to the 2 ingredient diet when I should have also taken into account that I was not attending crossfit that week because I'd tweaked my back.

I had a bad outbreak after breaking from Paleo last weekend and decided to fix my hands and feet by going back to 2 ingredients. I did that but my hands did not get any better this time. Then came a 3 day weekend for Japanese 'Umi no hi' and I went north with my girlfriend for a break. 3 days with no access to a gym so I trained superhard before we set off. The big breakout on the first day of our holiday was really confusing for me. Steak and sweet potatoes all week so how is it possible for a breakout now? My gut was feeling fine and I was eating super clean. Then I thought back to the marathon and started thinking of raised cortisol again. My chest felt like a truck had ridden over it from Friday's session on the rings, my glutes and hams were super stiff from overworking them on the squat rack that morning, and my hands and feet were breaking out again.

I'm going to take a break off exercise and see if it is the answer. I was hoping it was gutsense or food allergies causing this because then it is preventable. Perhaps in my subconscious I didn't see exercise as a threat because it's something that I need in my life. It might be that I have to eat less and workout twice a week to handle breakouts. If exercise is the cause for sure then I will concentrate my research more on cortisol and other body chemical reactions that can cause this. There will be a supplement on the market that can counter the affects and prevent outbreaks. Or if not I'll make one.

Thank you for posting your problem here, you have really helped me to get this straight in my head today after 4 years of head scratching.

ignacvucko
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:59 am
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by ignacvucko on Thu Jul 21, 2011 6:42 pm

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

Yes, I find that if I abstain from exercising my dyshytrotic excema does not occur -- no matter what my diet is.
Also, if severely limit how strenuous I exercise (eg: pulse does not go above 100), then it doesn't occur either.

I found some medical journals describing this as well (exercise induced skin rashes, exercise induced breathing difficulties, etc.)
For many people, exercise alone doesn't trigger it...but exerise after eating certain foods (eg: cucumbers) does.
For some it happens during or immediately after exercise, and for others it can happen as much as 1-2 days later.

The suggestions the paper gave, that might help you (though they don't seem to help me) are:
1) Abstain from eating anything for 3-4 hours before exercising
and/or
2) Take a strong dose of antihistamines 30minutes before exercising (eg: 2x 24h over the counter antihistamine pills)

Please let me know if you ever find something that works for you.

Thanks.

rachel_razzlemom
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:25 pm
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by rachel_razzlemom on Mon Jul 25, 2011 7:50 pm

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

My mother doesn't exercise but she has a really stressful job because she's managing a team of programmers. About a few months ago when she started to manage this team, she's been getting these small blisters on her hands. I've always assumed that her dyshidrosis is stress-related. She keeps applying steroid creams on them but they keep flaring up. Just yesterday, she was complaining to me how she has the blisters again.

So I think in your case, the same thing applies - your dyshidrosis is most likely to be stress related. It just so happens that your exercising ritual is the one that's stressing you. Maybe you should avoid performing strenuous exercises and do lighter ones. That way, you'd keep yourself in shape without necessarily triggering your dyshidrosis.

- Rachel :geek:

ignacvucko
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:59 am
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by ignacvucko on Tue Jul 26, 2011 2:07 pm

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

Thanks for your reply.
I'm sick and tired of hearing dermatologists say "...it's stress related".
I ask them to define "stress" and they come back with a description of a mental condition -- NOT a physical condition.
I can be in the MOST stressful of situations in both work and life, and so long as I don't exercise -- no eczema and no problem.
But, put me on a 3 week vacation with ZERO stress and tell me to go out for a 20 minute run and suddenly I get instant dyshydrotic eczema.

Avoiding exercise is just not healthy nor a way I want to live my life.

Looking for other people who have the same symptoms and hoping they might know some tricks to work around or suppress the immune system during and after exercising.

Thanks.

Kiedrea
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:20 pm
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by Kiedrea on Mon Aug 08, 2011 1:40 am

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

Hi Ignacvucko,

After reading your original post I was able to correlate my outbreaks with my exercise. I concluded that the raised cortisol from exercising was releasing histamines into the bloodstream and escaping through the easiest exit point being the fingers and toes. Glucagon and cortisol levels (which increase with exercise) influence liver glycogen release into the bloodstream. When liver glycogen is depleted, blood glucose drops
and the resulting hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is one cause of fatigue during aerobic exercise.

I took a week off exercise and my feet and hands began to improve. Then I went out for drinks with work in Crocs with no socks on. A hot and humid summer's night in Tokyo meant for a lot of foot sweating and when I got home from the night out my feet were completely broken out.
Then I came across this post by "CaroltheCatLover".

http://health.dir.groups.yahoo.com/grou ... sage/10115

She is a doctor who has cured 14 out of 16 patients that have come to her with Dyshidrotic eczema. She wrote that DE is not an allergic reaction to food, not related to exercise or stress, but it is simply an allergic reaction to a fungus somewhere on the body. It could be jock itch, athlete's foot, ring-worm etc. Fungus lives on the body naturally but for some people it can get out of control especially when the body gets hot. In these cases the fungus begins to thrive and as a by-product the fungus releases it's waste material into the blood stream. The body releases histamines into the blood stream to combat the foreign bodies, however fungal waste material is dead matter, and histamines have no affect on it. The surplus of histamines has to exit somewhere, and chooses the shortest route from the capillaries which is through the extremities. (This is all just a re-hash of Carol's many posts.)

So here's what I did:

Couldn't workout without shoes because feet were unsightly, but had very hot showers straight after, scolding my feet and hands at the end of the showers.
Dried feet and hands carefully afterwards.
Drizzled Microspor that I got from the doctor's over my feet once they were dry.
Microspor is supposed to be used once a day, but after looking up the side-effects, I saw that it causes dryness and cracking of the skin if overused. I thought to hell with it, I'll take dry skin over dyshidrotic eczema in the short term any day and deal with it later.
The hands got no treatment; if you send the fungus into remission, the hands will heal themselves as they are only the outlet.
Changed out shoes for new cotton socks and Crocs (Even kicked the Crocs off under my desk at work).
Barefoot, hot shower, dry, Microspor, and feet up watching TV with a fan on my feet as soon as I got home from work every day.

After 1 week of microspor my feet were dry and sore. the Microspor stopped stinging like mad when I applied it though, so I changed to hydrocortizone gel on the dry bits after Microspor.

2 weeks later and I am now exercising barefoot. My feet look good and don't get as sweaty in shoes.
Still scold them with hot water in the shower after exercising, still applying Microspor to my good looking feet.
The Japanese doc told me that I will always be susceptible to athlete's foot, Microspor is cheap and I should try it every now and then, and if my feet sting, then I should go back to regular use until they stop stinging.
I have had one day without vesicles showing up on my hands, and have had 2 days since then with one or two. I think this is remnants of histamines exiting from the blood stream.
4 years of research and I am starting to understand the biological process of dyshidrotic eczema (in my body at least).

As always, what works for someone may not work for another, thought I would share my information just in case it is helpful to you. Credit to CarolTheCatLover on the Yahoo DE Forum.

ignacvucko
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:59 am
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by ignacvucko on Wed Aug 10, 2011 3:17 am

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

Thanks so much for your post.

So:
- What does the hot water do? Kill the fungus? (I've tried hot water a means to relieve the itch)
- I assume you meant Mycospore -- what does it do? Kill the fungus?
- Is the fungus on the skin, or internal to the body -- if the latter, then what good will the hot water or Mycospore do?

Can you please update this thread with how things work out for you in the coming weeks/months...thanks

Kiedrea
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:20 pm
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by Kiedrea on Wed Aug 10, 2011 4:08 am

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

Hiya,

After helping the itching I think the hot water helps to kill, and then leaves everything very dry after. Fungus thrives on warm and damp so if there is any fungus in there the hot water can only do good.

Is it Mycospore? I got it from a Japanese doctor so I wasn't sure how to write it in english. I think you are right, yeah. I just looked at the label and it says "mai-ko-su-po-ru" in japanese.

I don't know if the fungus is on the skin or internal to the body. I assume it it on the skin because when I sent my athlete's foot into remission my feet and hands are in much better shape. Saying that though I woke up today with some vesicles on my little toe and a few on my fingers. I applied Mycospor liquid to my toes and there was no trademark stinging.

It's been very humid this week so perhaps there is a site of fungus elsewhere on my body that I am reacting to?
I am washing and examining my feet twice a day in the hope that these post-athlete's foot vesicles are going to slowly die out. For me it's all about treating my feet really well, and keeping my them in excellent shape.

rachel_razzlemom
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:25 pm
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by rachel_razzlemom on Sun Aug 14, 2011 10:40 am

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

ignacvucko wrote:Thanks for your reply.
I'm sick and tired of hearing dermatologists say "...it's stress related".
I ask them to define "stress" and they come back with a description of a mental condition -- NOT a physical condition.
I can be in the MOST stressful of situations in both work and life, and so long as I don't exercise -- no eczema and no problem.
But, put me on a 3 week vacation with ZERO stress and tell me to go out for a 20 minute run and suddenly I get instant dyshydrotic eczema.

Avoiding exercise is just not healthy nor a way I want to live my life.

Looking for other people who have the same symptoms and hoping they might know some tricks to work around or suppress the immune system during and after exercising.

Thanks.
I didn't tell you that it's definitely stress that's causing your dyshidrosis. Because what triggers dyshidrosis varies among people. Okay. I think I now have an idea what's happening with you. But then again, I may be wrong. What actually happens with dyshidrotic eczema is the blood vessels in the hands/feet have increased permeability. This means that components in the blood stream could easily leak out towards the skin and vice versa - this is not normal by the way. When you exercise, your blood vessels dilate which makes them thinner and permeable. As a result, serum leaks out of the blood vessels towards your skin and causing those blisters. Serum, by the way, is a normal component of the blood and is supposed to stay in the blood stream. But with dyshidrotic eczema, the serum finds its way on to the epidermal layer of the skin on the hands/feet, causing the blisters. Do you get me here?

Since you don't want to quit/minimize your exercise routine, then maybe you just have to deal with your blisters with home remedies every time they show up. The quickest home remedy I know is to prick the blisters with a needle then wash them with rubbing alcohol (surgical spirit). The blisters should be gone in a few hours. This is a painful remedy but very effective and very fast too. It's also helpful in preventing skin infections which you are prone to during a dyshidrosis outbreak.

Yoona
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 12:03 pm
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by Yoona on Thu Mar 08, 2012 12:07 pm

Re: Dyshydrotic Eczema & Exercise

This thread is very informative. My friend had once an eczema and she didn’t know what to do.




la baie acai

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