Log In Register

Online clinic on sexual health - Jun 2015

The STI Clinic is an online sexual health service that provides a quick, reliable and confidential service for you to test for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the comfort of your own home
myCondom.com is the UK & Europe's favourite condom website, offering a wide range of condoms, lubricants & sex toys at the cheapest prices.

talkhealth > Clinics > Online Clinics Index > Online clinic on sexual health - Jun 2015 > pregnancy

pregnancy

Moderator: talkhealth

IVF on the NHS

Postby Tonto1977 on Wed Jun 10, 2015 11:18 am

Hi, looking for some firm advise here. I’m 38 this year and my partner is 41 this year, both in Aug ( No kids between us). We have been trying for a baby for 18 months and with no luck, I’ve had two sperm tests and first was just below average, second was very low and I’m just about to do a third, my partner is taking recommended medication to get things at her end going but has struggled to ovulate. We are being referred to the fertility clinic, can some tell me how many treatments we get for free before we have to pay. I know our age has a factor. My partners doctor said this morning that we are eligible for her up to 42 and 364 days old!! is this correct!!, also has is there a waiting list, how long could all this take!! some help would be great in this. Thanks Campbell
Tonto1977
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 10, 2015 11:09 am

Re: IVF on the NHS

Postby Louisa Draper on Wed Jun 10, 2015 1:55 pm

Hi there, thanks for your message. First of all, when you get to the fertility clinic, they will do various other tests, examinations etc, to decide what the best treatments will be. There are sometimes other things that can be done, before you get to the stage of IVF.

If you do need to have IVF, your doctor needs to discuss the risks and benefits, before they decide if you should go ahead. Below I have posted the guidance from "NICE" (who publish guidelines about treatments in the UK) about who should receive treatment however I believe that it can vary depending on your particular location and situation, so the best advice would be to ask straight away at the fertility clinic, and explain your concerns, so that you know what to expect.

This is the general guidance as published by NICE (http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg156/i ... tilisation):

Women aged under 40 years should be offered 3 full cycles of IVF if:
- you have been trying to get pregnant through regular unprotected sexual intercourse for a total of 2 years or
- you are using artificial insemination to conceive and you have not become pregnant after 12 cycles – at least 6 of these cycles should have been using intrauterine insemination.
However, if your tests show that there appears to be no chance of you conceiving naturally and that IVF is the only treatment that is likely to help, you should be referred straightaway for IVF.
Any previous cycles of IVF you have had (including cycles that you have paid for yourself) will count towards the 3 cycles you should be offered by the NHS. This is because the chances of having a baby fall with the number of unsuccessful cycles of IVF.

Women aged 40–42 years should be offered 1 full cycle of IVF if all of the following apply:
- you have been trying to get pregnant through regular unprotected sexual intercourse for a total of 2 years or you have not become pregnant after 12 cycles of artificial insemination (at least 6 of these cycles should have been through intrauterine insemination)
- you have never had IVF treatment before
- your fertility tests show that your ovaries would respond normally to fertility drugs
- you and your doctor have discussed the risks of fertility treatment and pregnancy in women aged 40 years or older.
If your tests show that there appears to be no chance of you conceiving naturally and that IVF is the only treatment that is likely to help, you should be referred straightaway for IVF.

I know this is a bit wordy, so if you have further questions, then let us know. And in addition, I would check with your GP or fertility specialist, as it can vary depending on your location. I wish you all the best, and hope that everything goes well for you and your partner.
User avatar
Louisa Draper
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2015 1:14 pm

Re: IVF on the NHS

Postby Dr Helen Webberley on Thu Jun 11, 2015 4:28 pm

Hi there, even if you have a low sperm count, then you still may have enough to make a baby. If your partner is not ovulating then you won't conceive.

People forget about the very simple treatment called Clomid - clomifene - clomiphene.

This is a simple tablet which can make ovulation more reliable and give you that vital egg. This does not come under the rules for IVF and it is something your GP should be able to prescribe for you. Is this the medication your partner is taking?

Some GPs do not feel comfortable or qualified to prescribe this, which is a shame, as it is a very simple and safe and effective way of enhancing ovulation.
Dr Helen Webberley
NHS GP and Director of www.MyWebDoctor.co.uk
MBChB MRCGP MFSRH DipGUM DipIPM
http://www.talkhealthpartnership.com/online_clinics/experts/dr_helen_webberley.php
User avatar
Dr Helen Webberley
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2015 10:31 am

Who is online
Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest