Mold allergy or toxicity?

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gabehenk3@outlook.com
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2023 9:42 pm
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by gabehenk3@outlook.com on Sat Jan 07, 2023 10:03 pm

Mold allergy or toxicity?

Hello,

Some background information:
I live in an old house from 1880 with high moisture inside. There are some places in the house near wkndows and against walls with some black looking mold spots.

Since 3 years ago im having worsening health problems which i cant explain. It began with burning eyes when i looked at PC screens and when i woke up. The following year some eczemia around my mouth and inflammation of the skin around my eyes were common symptoms.

At this point i strongly suspected a dust mite allergy which i got tested for along with some other common inhaled allergens. All of these were found to be negative via an official skin test at the medical centre.

This fall and winter symptoms are getting even worse with more respitory problems like wheezing, trouble breathing in crowded rooms. I now suspect it to be the mold.thats common in out house.
Some extra problems im having when cleaning the mold are weird muscle aches in the jaw, and random other body parts and some kind of metal scent (ketones). The metal smell i recognize from my diabetes type 1. When i hyperglycemic i also lightly get this smell.

The symptoms i have pretty much always flare up when i am inside the house and they come in waves. All these constant symptoms made it that i right nownhave a reallly hard time functioning. I used to like to go out alot, bit these problems have made me a hermit trying to find out what the problem is, or too tired to do anything.

Im in a waiting list for an appiontment with my doctor. Do these symptoms and the way i described them look like a mold problem? Or are there possible other things i am overlooking?

Thanks in advance

MissCandyGirl
Posts: 575
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 6:11 pm
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by MissCandyGirl on Wed Jan 25, 2023 10:37 am

Re: Mold allergy or toxicity?

You're allergic to the mold in your home.

You MUST have a professional come in and remove it. If it is as bad as you say, you need to deal with it immediately. This mold carrie spores: these spores go into your lungs and make you sick. I'd advise staying with a friend for the time being: and - again - get a professional to fully remove ALL the mold in your home.

Please act today.

louiseone006@gmail.com
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by louiseone006@gmail.com on Fri Jun 09, 2023 5:52 am

Re: Mold allergy or toxicity?

Mold allergy or mold toxicity refers to the adverse reactions that occur when individuals are exposed to mold spores or mycotoxins produced by molds. Mold is a type of fungus that can grow indoors and outdoors, often in damp or humid environments. While most people are unaffected by mold exposure, some individuals may develop allergic reactions or experience toxic effects.
Identify and remove the source Locate any areas in your home or workplace where mold growth is present. This could be visible mold on surfaces or hidden mold behind walls, ceilings, or under carpets. Fix any leaks or water damage that may be promoting mold growth. If necessary, consider hiring a professional mold remediation service to safely remove the mold.

MissCandyGirl
Posts: 575
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 6:11 pm
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by MissCandyGirl on Wed Sep 20, 2023 1:30 pm

Re: Mold allergy or toxicity?

louiseone006@gmail.com wrote:
Fri Jun 09, 2023 5:52 am
Mold allergy or mold toxicity refers to the adverse reactions that occur when individuals are exposed to mold spores or mycotoxins produced by molds. Mold is a type of fungus that can grow indoors and outdoors, often in damp or humid environments. While most people are unaffected by mold exposure, some individuals may develop allergic reactions or experience toxic effects.
Identify and remove the source Locate any areas in your home or workplace where mold growth is present. This could be visible mold on surfaces or hidden mold behind walls, ceilings, or under carpets. Fix any leaks or water damage that may be promoting mold growth. If necessary, consider hiring a professional mold remediation service to safely remove the mold.
This is advice I urge anyone with mold in their home to follow.

Mold has been known to kill and MUST be dealt with quickly. Children especially can become very sick from breathing in mold. It's been known to cause serious illness.

Anyone living in a rented property who has mold in their home should contact their housing association immediately. Mold spreads quickly and makes people very sick. Your landlord must act straight away.

opdsureplan
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2023 10:30 am
Location: Delhi
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by opdsureplan on Tue Nov 21, 2023 10:34 am

Re: Mold allergy or toxicity?

Mold allergy and mold toxicity are related but distinct concepts.

Mold Allergy:

Definition: Mold allergy refers to an allergic reaction to mold spores or mold-related substances.
Symptoms: People with mold allergies may experience symptoms such as sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes, skin rashes, and in some cases, asthma symptoms like wheezing and difficulty breathing.
Triggers: Mold spores are tiny, airborne particles released by molds as part of their reproductive process. When inhaled or come into contact with the skin, they can trigger allergic reactions in susceptible individuals.
Common Mold Types: Common indoor molds include Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Alternaria.
Mold Toxicity:

Definition: Mold toxicity, also known as mycotoxicosis, refers to the adverse health effects resulting from exposure to mycotoxins—chemicals produced by certain molds.
Symptoms: Symptoms of mold toxicity can vary widely and may include fatigue, headaches, respiratory issues, skin rashes, joint pain, and neurological symptoms. Severe exposure can lead to more serious health problems.
Sources: Some molds produce mycotoxins, which can contaminate indoor environments, especially in areas with water damage or high humidity. Stachybotrys chartarum, commonly known as "black mold," is one example associated with mycotoxin production.
Routes of Exposure: Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion (from contaminated food), or skin contact.
It's important to note that not everyone exposed to mold will develop an allergy or experience toxicity symptoms. Individuals with compromised immune systems, respiratory conditions, or pre-existing allergies may be more susceptible. Prevention measures include controlling indoor humidity levels, promptly addressing water damage or leaks, and proper ventilation.

If someone suspects mold-related health issues, it's advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or an environmental health specialist. Testing for mold in the environment and seeking medical advice can help determine the appropriate course of action for managing symptoms and addressing potential mold exposure.

MissCandyGirl
Posts: 575
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 6:11 pm
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by MissCandyGirl on Sat Dec 09, 2023 8:55 am

Re: Mold allergy or toxicity?

opdsureplan wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2023 10:34 am
Mold allergy and mold toxicity are related but distinct concepts.

Mold Allergy:

Definition: Mold allergy refers to an allergic reaction to mold spores or mold-related substances.
Symptoms: People with mold allergies may experience symptoms such as sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes, skin rashes, and in some cases, asthma symptoms like wheezing and difficulty breathing.
Triggers: Mold spores are tiny, airborne particles released by molds as part of their reproductive process. When inhaled or come into contact with the skin, they can trigger allergic reactions in susceptible individuals.
Common Mold Types: Common indoor molds include Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Alternaria.
Mold Toxicity:

Definition: Mold toxicity, also known as mycotoxicosis, refers to the adverse health effects resulting from exposure to mycotoxins—chemicals produced by certain molds.
Symptoms: Symptoms of mold toxicity can vary widely and may include fatigue, headaches, respiratory issues, skin rashes, joint pain, and neurological symptoms. Severe exposure can lead to more serious health problems.
Sources: Some molds produce mycotoxins, which can contaminate indoor environments, especially in areas with water damage or high humidity. Stachybotrys chartarum, commonly known as "black mold," is one example associated with mycotoxin production.
Routes of Exposure: Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion (from contaminated food), or skin contact.
It's important to note that not everyone exposed to mold will develop an allergy or experience toxicity symptoms. Individuals with compromised immune systems, respiratory conditions, or pre-existing allergies may be more susceptible. Prevention measures include controlling indoor humidity levels, promptly addressing water damage or leaks, and proper ventilation.

If someone suspects mold-related health issues, it's advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or an environmental health specialist. Testing for mold in the environment and seeking medical advice can help determine the appropriate course of action for managing symptoms and addressing potential mold exposure.
This is a very important post: if you've got mould in your home get it dealt with straight away. And don't let yourself be ignored. Reiterate that mould kills and can cause serious health problems.

MissCandyGirl
Posts: 575
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 6:11 pm
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by MissCandyGirl on Fri Feb 16, 2024 8:00 pm

Re: Mold allergy or toxicity?

I know someone who has mould spread all across their bathroom wall. It occurred when there was a leak outside. Mould then appeared on the inside wall. It can be removed but the leak needs to be repaired in order to stop the mould coming back.

Also, there was a BBC 1 programme. This woman lived in a one bedroom apartment and the mould was severely extensive. She complained to the Housing Association. She was told to remove it herself - which she did - but it came back fierce as ever. She had no choice but to move out.

When she went back to visit her old apartment on the TV programme the mould had gone: but it must've come back for new tenants. Basically, the source of the mould needs treating: not just the mould itself.

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