IBS

If you have any bowel or IBS questions that don't fit into the topics below please post them to our experts here.

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christine58
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Joined: Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:55 am
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by christine58 on Thu Apr 06, 2017 2:00 pm

IBS

I have suffered from IBS for years usual symptoms constipation bloating frequency to go and pain in back passage plus haemorrhoids At times my bowel doesn't seem to empty properly and have to go 3 or 4 times a day This affects how I feel ie. Personal hygiene I take vicol drink plenty of water and use proctosedyl

george09
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Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 11:12 pm
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by george09 on Mon Apr 10, 2017 9:38 pm

Re: IBS

i got ibs get constionpated alot whats the best thing to use for it

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Dr Jamal Hayat
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Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:28 am
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by Dr Jamal Hayat on Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:34 pm

Re: IBS

Whilst often the symptoms are not due to an underlying organic disease, it is important to rule this out in certain situations, for example blood tests to check for anaemia, raised markers of inflammation and an antibody test for coeliac disease. Whilst haemorrhoids are often associated with constipation related straining, it is important to have rectal bleeding investigated properly.
Often improvements to symptoms can be made by modifying lifestyle, increasing physical activity and diet. Maintain a good oral fluid intake, of 8 cups of non-caffeinated fluid per day (especially water), cut down fizzy drinks and alcohol. Do this along with a good insoluble fibre intake, eg with oats and linseed. But don’t overdo it – and it can be very useful to see a dietitian for further assistance with regards to this, and in certain situations to try particularly dietary exclusions.
Laxatives are sometimes necessary to improve constipation, ideally on an intermittent or temporary basis. There are no hard and fast rules about which ones to take initially, and individuals react differently to different classes. There are two main types used initially – stimulant laxatives which speed up the movement of the bowel, and osmotic laxatives which soften the stool, your GP or pharmacist should be able to help with an appropriate choice. There are a number of newer laxatives which are very effective, which can be used if different types have not helped, and are available from secondary care.
Less frequently, problems with constipation or incomplete evacuation can be as a result of an anatomical or physiological abnormality. For example – failure to coordinate the muscles appropriately when opening the bowels ‘pelvic dyssnergia’. This can be treated with biofeedback which helps to retrain and coordinate the appropriate pelvic floor muscles.
Dr Jamal Hayat
Consultant Gastroenterologist

http://www.talkhealthpartnership.com/on ... _hayat.php

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